Race Card defined

August 1, 2008

In my opinion the Race Card is a statement by a  person–of any race–who directly uses race to do any of the following:

1.)  Explain their poor performance or reason they haven’t achieved something on race; instead of personal actions/responsibility

2.)  Accuse others of gaining a position as a result of their race, without any objective assessment of that persons talents and accomplishments

3.)  Those who play the Race Card typically play the “victim” mentality

***Typically the “Race Card” is used as a distraction from real issues.  e.g…the economy -or- upcoming court cases -or- Afghanistan

All this discussion about the Race Card makes me sick.  But, I decided to post this because the media is redefining the proper definition of the Race Card and I must battle back for fairness from my perch in the blogosphere.

Here are few real examples of the Race Card being played:

And another example of the Race Card (Listen closely at 2:40-Very closely at 4:10) and in text.

One more Race Card example for good measure by a Hollywood celebrity.

In contrast, this is just snark and not at all the race card–except as defined by the media who know that stories about conflict drive up ratings. Surprisingly someone else brought up the dollar bill idea months ago.

Your thoughts?  I know this is a minefield topic, however, it’s important that we look at things objectively and not just take the media “sound bite” version of things.

Does this constant debate on race help anybody?

In the words of Rodney King:  “Can’t we all just get along?”


Should the media cover military funerals

July 10, 2008
Fired ANC Public Affairs office

Fired Arlington National Cemetery Public Affairs officer

Hopefully my 18 month academic lobotomy at Georgetown will ensure that I make sound decisions when I graduate and embrace the media.

Recently the Public Affairs director at Arlington National Cemetery was fired for honoring a fallen Soldier’s family’s request to allow media at their loved ones funeral.  In April, one funeral was reported on by Dana Milbank in the Washington Post.  Today he has a full article about Gina Gray getting the “boot”.

In small towns across America there are monuments to honor our fallen Soldiers.  Remembering those killed in action is a necessary to keep the civilian citizenry engaged in the sacrifice Service members make while they “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic.”

Attending the funeral for Second Lieutenant Lisa N. Bryant at Arlington National Cemetery is an event I will never, ever forget.  I saw a similar event depicted on Army Wives and was touching but not quite the same.  The Soldiers of the Old Guard caissons platoon are among our Army’s finest ambassadors.  Their story and the story of the heroes who make the ultimate sacrifice on battlefields should be told.

I won’t speculate on any families reason to have media at a funeral.  What I do know is we celebrate our fallen heroes all the time.  Just a few weeks ago there many hours of live coverage of Tim Russert’s funeral and; Metro (Washington’s mass transit system) had it’s highest number of passengers during President Reagan’s state funeral.

This is all interesting to me.  There’s a balance between policy and free press.  Here’s an example of conflict between the two.  Most often the military has a hamonius and mutually beneficial relationship with the media.

What’s your opinion?  Have you ever been to a military funeral?